Tuesday, 3 September 2013

Fall for Cotton: the pattern

I'm making progress on my Fall for Cotton dress. This is my first time using a vintage pattern and I thought I would share a few of the differences between this pattern and the modern ones I'm used to. 
Mail Order 4675


I was surprised by how sturdy the tissue paper is for the pieces. Although faded, there is no degradation. It has been cut by a previous owner and you can see holes where they copied the darts, tuck lines, buttonholes etc but it doesn't look like it will split anytime soon. The instructions sheet is so different though. It is very fragile and is splitting dramatically along the fold lines. The holes in the left side get bigger every time I touch the paper. I knew it wouldn't survive the creation process so I took detailed photos of the bits I need. I like to choose electronic options were possible but I have missed being able to tick off which steps I have completed, especially when I don't follow them in order. 

Mail Order 4675

This is a printed pattern but there is more information on the pieces that I normally see. I'm pleased I took the time to look at them before I cut out. The first thing I noticed is that the cutting line and the seam line are included. On every piece, the seam line is marked in full. They are mainly 5/8" but there are a few 1/4" knocking around. 


Mail Order 4675

All of the notches are numbered and referred to in the instructions. I didn't realise this when I started and have had to disregard them as I didn't mark the numbers on my fabric. I don't think it has made much difference. 

Mail Order 4675

The terminology of the pattern is also different. It took me a while to realise that "seam" meant sew or stitch, or at least I think it does. The illustrations can be a little confusing, like the one below. Joining the facings looks easy enough but working out which stitching line you were meant to be looking at in the bottom diagram is harder. 

Mail Order 4675

I've managed to get through it though and I only have a couple of steps left to go. Hopefully it won't be long before I can share the completed dress with you. 

What differences have you noticed with vintage patterns compared to modern ones? 


7 comments:

  1. I remember seeing patterns like this - I think I started with similar in the 70's. My mothers patterns from the late 40's did not have instruction sheets at all. They were very similar to today's Marfy patterns.

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    Replies
    1. Hmm, no instruction sheets. Not sure I'm quite ready for that yet!

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  2. I also started sewing with patterns like this, and still have a few floating around. Looking forward to seeing your dress finished. Off to have a peek around your blog...J

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  3. Interesting that there's so much more information on the pattern pieces themselves! I have a fair few vintage patterns in my collection now although I haven't got round to attempting one yet. I totally want to, but I have the fear! I think it would have to be something I take very slowly.

    I'm doing Fall for Cotton but not using a vintage pattern - I'm using a modern pattern of a 50s style dress. I only decided to take part yesterday so haven't started yet and I'm sure I'll be in a mad rush to get it done. Can't wait to see yours!

    xxx

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    Replies
    1. Oooh, what are you making? I get your fear of vintage patterns, it took me a while to build up to this one but it does open up so many more opportunities once you go there. It has taken longer to sew this one because I'm not familiar with the language but it hasn't put me off trying another one.

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    2. I'm making Pauline Alice's new (first) pattern, the Cami dress. It's so cute! You're so right, I'm going to get over my fear and just start sewing one! x

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