Sunday, 24 May 2015

A Robson Summer Jacket

Are you full steam ahead in your current seasonal sewing? I'm certainly am! This make is in anticipation of cool mornings and evenings in spring and summer that the UK is so prone to. It also fills a gaping hole in my wardrobe: a lightweight summer jacket.

Summer Robson 3

It's no secret that I absolutely adore my Sewaholic Robson Trench Coat. It is one of my most worn items due to the shape, fit and fabric so it was pretty clear which pattern I would use for this jacket.

Summer Robson 2

I made a number of changes this time. The most obvious is changing the length so it finishes around my hips. The second is stripping away a lot of the features: the front storm flaps, epaulettes and sleeve tabs were all discarded. I took out 2cm from the back - regular exercise is definitely changing my shape! I decided to keep the back storm flap as I really like this part of a classic trench. Instead of cutting two and securing them with a button, I used one and top stitched the turned seam allowance. Shortening the length meant the pockets needed to move upwards. They are as high up as I could make them while maintaining comfort and practicality. 

Summer Robson

As you would expect, there is a lot of top stitching in this jacket. Every seam on the main part of the jacket is top stitched either side and including the sleeves. The stitching is even throughout and this makes me smile a lot. The stitching that lets the side down though is the bar tacks. I definitely need more practice to neaten them but at least each belt loop is very secure. Forgive the collar in the next photo - I should have straightened it out.  

Summer Robson 4

The fabric is a cotton drill from Plush Addict and a Christmas present from Adam's Grandpa. It is of great quality even if it crumples as soon as you touch it. It was fun and forgiving to work with. I managed to squeeze the jacket out of 2.5m - not bad when you want a fabric hungry belt. Shall we talk about the bright pink lining? Yes, that's right, I was far too lazy to want to deal with all the bias binding that I created a lining. Somehow cutting additional pieces, stitching and overlooking the seams seemed much a more attractive use of time than lining up and stitching perfect binding. More practically, the drill would stick to my clothes making it hard to pull the jacket on. I debated for a while on how to finish the lining ( a cotton silk I bought on Goldhawk Road) and in the end chose to bag it. I would recommend top stitching the outer shell before you bag as it is very easy to catch the lining in the stitches. 

Summer Robson insides

This has already become a staple of my wardrobe as it has had a lot of wear since completion. I just love it. The top stitching, fit and the happy colour are the major reasons for this. Although I love the purple, I'm tempted to make another in a more muted colour so I have all occasions covered but I'm not sure I yet justify another version. Do you have a pattern that you want to make over and over? 

14 comments:

  1. Very nice! I have wondered if this pattern would work as a short jacket, and yours looks great. I think you were smart to remove all the flaps and the epaulettes; they would have overwhelmed this shorter length. Yet even without them, the style still says trench. Perfect little spring and summer jacket!

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    1. Thanks, Gail. It was important to me that I retained the trench look so very pleased you still think it is there!

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  2. What a clever use of your pattern - I really love the colour (well - it is one of my favourites!) but most of all I love how you have made something so useful at this time of year. Another beauty Claire!

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    1. Isn't purple the best? It is definitely a super useful make - something that I haven't been good at in the past.

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  3. Very nice! You are making me rethink the pattern, since a trench coat isn't ideal for the climate I live it. The colour is beautiful, too. :)

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    1. It is a great pattern and I'm sure you could make it work for where you are.

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  4. I've seen this jacket IRL and it is even more impressive than in pictures. Truly gorgeous. I love the back topstitched storm flap, such a nice touch! A beautiful and at the same time practical make in a lovely colour. Well done on drafting the lining as well. It's those little things that take your garments to the next level.

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    1. Aww, thanks! Keeping the back storm flap helps keep the trench look.

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  5. This is so great this length. Love it and the colour on you.

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  6. This is fantastic! What a great idea to shorten it, and it definitely works without the extra details too. I love the colour (purple can never go wrong!) and the lining.

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    1. Thanks, Lynne. I love the shorter length and being able to continue to wear this pattern when it is too warm for the full length trench.

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  7. Oh I do love those lapels and pockets, Claire! But I think my fave is the yoke at the back- such a gorgeous detail!

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  8. I love it shortened! I am planning mine for fall and I planned to crop it to about where yours is which is how I ended up here. I do also think lining the arms would be best since it'll probably be worn over lots of long sleeved tops so thanks for the inspiration :)

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